Archive for inspiration

Spirituality in War: Victory Through Faith

Posted in Leadership, Quote of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 10, 2013 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

Sunday’s Spiritual Quote

“There is no substitute for the spiritual, in war.  Miracles must be wrought if victories are to be won, and to work miracles men’s hearts must…be afire with self-sacrificing love for each other, for their units, for their division, and for their country.  If each man knows that all the officers and men in his division are animated with the same fiery zeal as he himself feels, unquenchable courage and unconquerable determination crush out fear, and death becomes preferable to defeat or dishonor.”[i]

Major General John A. Lejeune, USMC

from The Reminiscences of a Marine

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The true strength of the men and women of our armed forces is their faith in themselves and in others; faith in their skills, their abilities and their resources.  They must have faith and courage to overcome adversity during the chaos of war and the constant struggles of military life.  Faith is the bedrock of teamwork, and General Lejeune’s quote speaks to the power of esprit de corps, and one’s solidarity and devotion to the love of victory over defeat for themselves, their teammates, their unit, and their country.  Therefore, it is one’s faith that becomes their secret weapon, and prayer is the secret battleground where victories are won.[ii]

Faith is confident assurance concerning what we hope for, and conviction about things we do not see.  Through faith we perceive that what is visible came into being through the invisible by faith.

Hebrews 11:1

 

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Footnote:

[i] The Reminiscences of a Marine. Major General John A. Lejeune. Philadelphia, PA: Dorrance and Company, 1930. Chapter Fifteen, Nancy, Marbache, Colombey – Les Belles. p. 307. Hathi Trust Digital Library (http://www.hathitrust.org/). Web. Date Accessed on 10 Feb. 2013. http://hdl.handle.net/2027/mdp.39015008300819

[ii] Prayer Is the Soul’s Sincere Desire – By James Montgomery (1771-1854) – Words written in 1818 at the re­quest of Ed­ward Bick­er­steth, who want­ed them for his book, Trea­tise on Pray­er.  Mont­gom­ery called this “the most at­tract­ive hymn I ev­er wrote.”

Photo Credit:

Lt.Gen. John Archer Lejeune (1867-1942) – Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune website – http://www.lejeune.marines.mil/

 

Related Articles:

The Navy Hymn: “Eternal Father, Strong to Save”

Posted in Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 14, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

On this Sunday following yesterday’s celebration of the 237th birthday of the United States Navy, I thought it appropriate to share with you the story of The Navy Hymn; Eternal Father, Strong to Save.”

Click HERE to listen to the hymn

Eternal Father, strong to save,
Whose arm hath bound the restless wave,
Who bidd’st the mighty ocean deep
Its own appointed limits keep;
Oh, hear us when we cry to Thee,
For those in peril on the sea!

O Christ! Whose voice the waters heard
And hushed their raging at Thy word,
Who walked’st on the foaming deep,
And calm amidst its rage didst sleep;
Oh, hear us when we cry to Thee,
For those in peril on the sea!

Most Holy Spirit! Who didst brood
Upon the chaos dark and rude,
And bid its angry tumult cease,
And give, for wild confusion, peace;
Oh, hear us when we cry to Thee,
For those in peril on the sea!

O Trinity of love and power!
Our brethren shield in danger’s hour;
From rock and tempest, fire and foe,
Protect them wheresoe’er they go;
Thus evermore shall rise to Thee
Glad hymns of praise from land and sea.

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The Rev. William Whiting, a schoolmaster and clergyman of the Church of England, who lived from 1825 to 1878, wrote the original words as a hymn in 1860.  In the following year, the words were adapted to music by another English clergyman, the Rev. John B. Dykes, who lived from 1823 to 1876.

In the United States, the late Rear Adm. Charles Jackson Train, an 1865 graduate of the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, was a lieutenant commander stationed at the Academy in charge of the Midshipman Choir.  In 1879, Lt. Cdr. Train inaugurated the present practice of concluding Sunday’s Divine Services at the Academy with the singing of the first verse of this hymn.  Today, this song can be found in most church hymnals.

This hymn is often used at funerals for personnel who served in, or were associated with, the Navy. For example, Eternal Father was the favorite hymn of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and was sung at his funeral at Hyde Park, New York in April 1945.  Roosevelt had served as Secretary of the Navy.  This hymn was also played as President John F. Kennedy’s body was carried up the steps of the capitol to lie in state.

The song, known to United States Navy men and women as the “Navy Hymn,” is a musical benediction.  It is a prayer for safety on the high seas. And, nobody senses the need of God more than those in peril; those in peril on the sea, on the land and in the air.  Those in the United States Navy need God’s strong arm, guarding hand and watchful care.

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Img5.jpgO Eternal Father, strong to save, we pause to remember the founding of the Navy.  We remember all who have served in the air, on land, on sea and under the sea.

Those whose lives were given in dark jungles, ocean depths, desert sands or on far distant bases and beaches.  May we recognize their contributions to the security of our nation.

Grant, O God, your blessing and protection on all men and women who now serve in our Navy, on watch and on station around the world, from the Caribbean to the Mediterranean, from the Western Pacific to the Middle East, especially those defending freedom in the Persian Gulf and Afghanistan.  O Lord, may our soldiers and sailors be a safeguard unto the United States of America.

Put new meaning in our national commitment of “Peace through Strength,” that we may truly strive to be instruments of peace in a distrustful world.

Almighty God, we commend to your gracious care and keeping all the men and women of our country’s Navy ashore and afloat, and all who serve in our Armed Forces.  Defend them day by day with your heavenly grace; strengthen them; keep them safe from evil; give them courage to face the perils which beset them and grant them a sense of your abiding presence wherever they may be.

God, who founded the seas and equipped them with the very resources that sustain life on this planet, we seek your will for our nation in meeting its obligations to maintain the freedom of the seas.  We ask your blessings on the ships and their crews of the United States Naval forces in meeting their commitments.  Preserve them from the dangers of sea, air & land and bring them safely to port.

On this occasion of the birth of the United States Navy, save, sanctify and bless those in the Navy with favoring winds over the sea and into harbor.  According to your good will, and as their divine and heavenly pilot, bring them at last to the haven of peace.

Related Article –

The 237th Birthday of the United States Navy (commandperformanceleadership.wordpress.com)

Some Final Thoughts from Dr. Stephen R. Covey

Posted in Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on August 2, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

Stephen Covey Stephen Covey

Stephen Richards Covey was an American educator, author, businessman and motivational speaker.  His most popular book was “The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People,” which was written to help individuals discover how they can be more effective by making conscious decisions as to how they will respond, act, and think.

On July 16, 2012, we lost this pioneer in leadership development.  Dr. Covey died at the Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center in Idaho Falls, Idaho, due to complications from a fall, having lost control of his bicycle in April.  He will be missed my many people here in the United States, and around the World.

Earlier this year, I posted, Good to Great (A Submariner’s Profile in Empowerment), a profile about Captain David Marquet, former Commanding Officer of the USS Santa Fe.  In that post, I mentioned Dr. Covey’s ride on that submarine, and that he discussed one of Captain Marquet’s leadership practices in his book, The 8th Habit.  More recently, upon his death, I posted a guest post by David Marquet to commemorate and honor the man entitled, In Memory of Dr. Stephen R. Covey (1932 – 2012).  That post was an impassioned reflection by Captain Marquet on how Dr. Covey impacted his life.  In that post, David wrote directly to the spirit of Dr. Covey writing, “Stephen, thank you for your influence, clear thinking, and enthusiasm for life. We will miss you.”

Stephen Covey rides USS Santa Fe with commanding officer David Marquet in 2000.Dr. Covey’s ride on the USS Santa Fe had made an enormous impression on him.  As I said earlier, he wrote a few pages in his book, The 8th Habit, but that wouldn’t be the last time Dr. Covey would express his thoughts about that day on the Santa Fe.  Three weeks before his bicycle accident, Dr. Covey sent David Marquet a written draft that would soon become the Foreword to David’s book, “Turn The Ship Around! How To Create Leadership at Every level.”  With the release of David’s book on August 1, this piece would become one of the last public writings Dr. Covey would pen.  With David’s permission, I am posting the Foreword here.  Along with David’s gracious permission to reprint these words, David offered the following:

I thank Stephen for all his support of our project.  It’s no doubt, due to his influence, that the book has started out as the #1 new release in leadership.  I’m sorry he’s not here to see that.
 
L. David Marquet
Author, “Turn The Ship Around! How To Create Leadership at Every Level”
 
I present to you Some Final Thoughts from Dr. Stephen R. Covey; the foreword to Turn the Ship Around! –

Foreword

by Dr. Stephen R. Covey

I had the opportunity to ride the USS Santa Fe during Captain Marquet’s command tour and observed firsthand the impact of his leadership approach. It had a profound impact on what I thought possible in terms of empowered and engaged workplaces.

I had been training U.S. Navy officers in leadership during the dot.com era, when I started hearing about something really special happening on a submarine in Hawaii. When an opportunity arose to ride the USS Santa Fe I jumped at. I embarked on Captain Marquet’s submarine to see what the buzz was about. Never before had I observed such empowerment. We stood on the bridge of this multibillion-dollar nuclear submarine in the crystal clear waters off of Lahaina, Maui, moving silently along the surface of the water. Shortly after getting underway, a young officer approached the captain and said, “Sir, I intend to take this ship down 400 feet.” Captain Marquet asked about the sonar contacts and bottom depth and then instructed this young man to give us another few minutes on the bridge before carrying out his intention.

Throughout the day, people approached the captain intending to do this or do that. The captain would sometimes ask a question or two, and then say, “Very well.” He reserved only the tip of the iceberg type decisions for his own confirmation. The great mass of the iceberg – the other 95 percent of the decisions – were being made without any involvement or confirmation by the captain whatsoever. Wherever I went on the submarine, the control room, the torpedo room, even the galley where they were preparing lunch, I witnessed a dispersed intensity of operations I hadn’t expected. The crew was amazingly involved and there was a constant low-level chatter of sharing information.

I can’t say I actually saw the captain give an order.

I asked David how he achieved this turnabout. He said he wanted to empower his people as far as he possibly could within the Navy’s confines, and maybe a little bit more. There was a mischievous twinkle in his eye when he told me that. He felt if he required them to own the problem and the solution to it, they would begin to view themselves as a vitally important link in the chain of command. He created a culture where those sailors had a real sense of adding value. But that answer only makes clear his objective, not what it actually takes – from the top man in the organization and everyone else – to accomplish this.

How do you create such an organization? What does it take?

The answer is in this book.

WHAT I LOVE ABOUT THIS BOOK

First of all, this is a great story, one of self-discovery, tension, and the lonely self-doubts of the leader who sets off on an unknown path. We know now that Captain Marquet’s experiment on Santa Fe was wildly successful, but at the time, neither he nor the courageous crew who embraced this new way of running an organization, knew if it would work.

Second, the book provides the specific mechanisms they used on Santa Fe to achieve the transformation. We learn what they did, how the crew reacted – good or bad – and how the mechanisms matured with time. The good news is that these mechanisms are about how we interact as people, and are universally applicable. You can apply them in your organization – business, school, government, and family.

Third, the book presents a comprehensive paradigm shift for how we think about leadership. Captain Marquet has coined the phrase “leader-leader” to differentiate from the leader-follower approach traditional leadership models have espoused. I think that laying out this distinction in such opposing terms is a good idea. Having personally witnessed how Santa Fe operated, I can attest that this new way is not a nuanced modification of how we are doing business now – it is fundamentally different, and that is where its power lies.

WHY YOU WANT TO READ THIS BOOK

No matter where you are in your company’s organization chart, you’ll want to read this book. People at the top will learn how they can release the passion, intellect, and energy of those below them. They may be unwittingly behaving and taking actions that work against those goals.

People on the front lines will also find ways to embrace decision-making and make it easier for bosses to let go of control.

We are in the middle in one of the most profound shifts in human history, where the primary work of mankind is moving from the Industrial Age of “control” to the Knowledge Worker Age of “release.” As Albert Einstein said, “The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them.” They certainly won’t be solved by one person, even and especially the one “at the top.”

Our world’s bright future will be built by people who have discovered that leadership is the enabling art. It is the art of releasing human talent and potential. You may be able to “buy” a person’s back with a paycheck, position power, or fear, but a human being’s genius, passion, loyalty and tenacious creativity is volunteered only. The world’s greatest problems will be solved by passionate, unleashed “volunteers.”

My definition of leadership is this: Leadership is communicating to people their worth and potential so clearly that they are inspired to see it in themselves. I don’t know of a finer model of this kind of empowering leadership than Captain Marquet. And in the pages that follow you will find a model for your pathway

Remember, leadership is a choice, not a position. I wish you well on your voyage!

— Stephen R. Covey, Spring 2012

Learning from Stephen Covey aboard USS Santa Fe

 

*Reprinted with permission from “Turn The Ship Around!: How to Create Leadership at Every Level”, by L. David Marquet, 2012, Greenleaf Book Group Press, Austin, Texas. Copyright © 2012 by Louis David Marquet.

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Dr. Stephen Covey

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Related Articles –

What I Learned from Stephen Covey: Begin with the End in Mind (posted 18 July 2012) (leader-leader.com/blog)

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Pithy Points to Ponder (How Do You Motivate Your Employees?)

Posted in Leadership, Motivation with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 30, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

A few weeks ago, in the LinkedIn group Innovative Leadership & Change Management Expert Innovators NetworkBrandon W. Jones started a discussion entitled, How Do You Motivate Your Employees?.  Brandon had previously posted an article by the same name on his blog, and was using the LinkedIn group to get a variety of opinions.  Brandon attracted quite a few people, including me, to express their thoughts on the topic of motivation.  I commented on this discussion post in the LinkedIn group, and I wanted to share my pithy point to ponder about motivation with you in this post; to get your opinions and thoughts.

At the end of this post is an absolute goldmine of articles and resources about motivation.  I encourage you to dive into this information, especially if you are interested in further study and research on the subject of employee motivation.  Also, I want to hear what you have to say about motivation and motivating people.  What has worked for you?  Please share your comments in the section provided, at the end of this post.

This post begins a series on the topic of motivation in both the military and corporate environments.

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My Pithy Point to Ponder

Leaders cannot motivate.  Leaders can only provide the positive environment to enable one to be motivated.  Motivation is an internal function of each person.  One can only motivate themselves, given the right circumstances and situation within their environment.  One can only be motivated to do something if they themselves want to do what needs to be done.  Fear, intimidation, and even incentives may not be enough. Internal stress and pressure, or on a positive scale, self-fulfillment, emotional satisfaction and success will be the stimulants and drivers to one’s motivation.

Dale Richard Wilson, Sr.

Blogger @ Command Performance Leadership

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Motivation

In my research for this post, I came across a great article on this topic entitled, “How to motivate employees: What managers need to know,” in Psychology Today.  I think it pins this subject down very well:

How many management articles, books, speeches and workshops have pleaded plaintively, “How do I get employees to do what I want?”  Motivating people to do their best work, consistently, has been an enduring challenge for executives and managers. Even understanding what constitutes human motivation has been a centuries old puzzle, addressed as far back as Aristotle…

…The things that make people satisfied and motivated on the job are different in kind from the things that make them dissatisfied. Ask workers what makes them unhappy at work, and you’ll hear them talk about insufficient pay or an uncomfortable work environment, or “stupid” regulations and policies that are restraining or the lack of job flexibility and freedom. So environmental factors can be demotivating…

…It turns out that people are motivated by interesting work, challenge, and increasing responsibility–intrinsic factors. People have a deep-seated need for growth and achievement…the focus on motivation remained the “carrot-and-stick” approach, or external motivators…

…What do we mean by motivation? It’s been defined as a predisposition to behave in a purposeful manner to achieve specific, unmet needs and the will to achieve, and the inner force that drives individuals to accomplish personal and organizational goals. And why do we need motivated employees? The answer is survival…

John Baldoni, author of “Great Motivation Secrets of Great Leaders,” concluded that motivation comes from wanting to do something of one’s own free will, and that motivation is simply leadership behavior–wanting to do what is right for people and the organization…

…In the July, 2008 issue of the Harvard Business Review, authors Nitin Nohria, Boris Groysberg and Linda-Eling Lee describe a new model of employee motivation. They outline the four fundamental emotional drives that underlie motivation:

1)      The drive to acquire (the acquisition of scarce material things, including financial compensation, to feel better)

2)      the drive to bond (developing strong bonds of love, caring and belonging)

3)      the drive to comprehend (to make sense of our world so we can take the right actions)

4)      the drive to defend (defending our property, ourselves and our accomplishments)…

…In his…book, “Drive,” Daniel Pink, author of “A Whole New Mind,” describes what he says is “the surprising truth” about what motivates us. Pink says that true motivation boils down to three elements: Autonomy, the desire to direct our own lives; mastery, the desire to continually improve at something that matters to us, and purpose, the desire to do things in service of something larger than ourselves. Pink…warns that the traditional “command-and-control” management methods in which organizations use money as a contingent reward for a task, are not only ineffective as motivators, but actually harmful… (see also “Dan Pink: The surprising science of motivation,” a TED Talks presentation)

…Joseph Le Doux, in his book, “Human Emotions: A Reader,” describes new recent brain research that has shown that emotions are the driver for decision-making, which includes aspects of motivation…

*Source – “How to Motivate Employees — What Managers Need to Know” – Published on February 13, 2010 by Ray Williams in Wired for Success – Accessed 30 July 2012 – Psychology Today – http://www.psychologytoday.com/

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Another brief and accurate summary about motivation:

“Different people are motivated by different things. I may be greatly motivated by earning time away from my job to spend more time my family. You might be motivated much more by recognition of a job well done. People are not motivated by the same things. Again, a key goal is to understand what motivates each of your employees.”

Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, from the answer to myth #4 inClearing Up Common Myths About Employee Motivation

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Since Brandon ignited this discussion, inspiring me to write this post, I wanted to provide Brandon full attribution by listing his various online resources and social media outlets:

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/brandonwjones

Twitter: https://twitter.com/BrandonWJones1

Blog: http://brandonwjones.me/ and “Leadership Done Right” at http://leadershipdoneright.com/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/LeadershipDoneRight

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/brandonwjones2

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/brandonwjones/

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Related Articles –

**HIGHLY RECOMMENDED** Motivating Employees (wsj.com)

**HIGHLY RECOMMENDED** Helping People to Motivate Themselves and Others (managementhelp.org) – From the Free Management Library, you can absolutely get lost in this website with the articles and resources available on the topic of motivation.  I encourage and challenge you to do just that.

Motivating Employees (inc.com) – Great collection of articles about motivation and motivating employees.

Motivation and Retention (entrepreneur.com) – Another good collection of articles about motivation (and retention).

Employee Motivation, Morale, Recognition, Rewards, Retention (humanresources.about.com) – An endless list of links to articles and resources from the Human Resources site on About.com.

Motivating Your Staff in a Time of Change – Want to Know What’s Most Important About Motivating Employees? (humanresources.about.com)

5 Ways to Keep Your Employees Motivated Without Breaking the Bank (forbes.com)

7 Tips for Motivating Employees (inc.com)

The Open Secret To Motivating Employees

20 Ways to Motivate Your Employees Without Raising Their Pay (biztrain.com)

Why Motivation Works … And When (kumardeepak.wordpress.com)

What’s Behind Human Motivation? Leadership Book Review: Meet Your Happy Chemicals by Loretta Breuning (davidmarquet.com)

Thursday’s reads: how to motivate people (has links to four articles on motivation) (davidmarquet.com)

How Do You Motivate in a Community Organization? (davidmarquet.com)

Posts from the ‘Motivation’ Category – Page 1 & Page 2 of Steve Keating’s LeadToday blog

16 Ways to Motivate Employees and to Celebrate Their Successes (majorium.wordpress.com)

Leaders: It’s Not All About the Money (linked2leadership.com)

How Much Money Would It Take To Be Unhappy? (managebetternow.com)

Were You Inspired to Become a Leader, or Promoted Into a Leadership Position?

Posted in Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on July 18, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

Earlier today, I tweeted this question from my Twitter account.  And, after giving it some thought, I decided to open this question up to the World to be answered, by way of my blog.

Virtually all leaders have a very unique and interesting answer to this question.  Through this post, I want to survey leaders to hear their story.  And, since this is such a dynamic post and discussion, I will be making it a destination link on my list of pages on my blog’s homepage.  I am hoping to attract leaders from all circles of our World; military and civilian, corporate and government, volunteer and community groups, etc.  I encourage you to participate.

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Why (or how) did you become a leader?  Were you inspired to become a leader, or promoted into a leadership position?

Many people work most of their entire career to ultimately become a leader at various levels; a leader of a team of people or department, or a leader of an entire organization.  In some instances, they are inspired to grow professionally and personally to acquire the traits, talents and skills necessary to be more successful, and to become a leader.  In other instances, progressively successful people simply move up the ladder through meritorious advancement; promoted as a result of doing a good job or passing various thresholds of time, accomplishment and success.

A discussion like this can go very deep; and, I hope it does.  But, quite simply, I wanted to ask you what made you a leader?  In most cases, regardless of the path or motivation, you no doubt became a leader by your own actions.  But, were you inspired to become a leader?  Were you motivated to grow and become a leader because of the organization you worked for?  Were you inspired by a boss you worked for?  Maybe that boss acted as a mentor (or, in the Navy, we called it a Sea Daddy: A senior, more experienced sailor who unofficially takes a new member of the crew under his wing and mentors him. Senior Enlisted Advisor a CPO in charge of your career).  Or, did you just simply punch your ticket while ascending the ladder of success?

In the early stages of my career, I was not a leader, as I did not yet acquire the knowledge or achievements to earn a promotion, nor did I thoroughly possess the traits or virtues of a leader.  I had to continue to develop those things over time.  But, in my case, I did have a few people above me in the chain-of-command who saw something in me;  They saw leadership potential.  Notice I said potential.  These individuals had already been an inspiration to me, and I had a strong desire to emulate them.  I watched them closely, learning from their actions (their successes, mistakes and pitfalls).  I learned how that treated people; how they managed them, how they disciplined them, how they taught and mentored them.  I learned how they ran their respective organizations.  I learned from their business-sense and fundamental management styles, as well as the way they handled their day-to-day challenges.  From them, I learned what to do and what not to do to become more successful.  I was fortunate to have leaders who were worth watching. 

What these individuals saw in me early in my career began to grow and blossom.  Through hard work and a strong work ethic, over time, I was promoted into a series of supervisory positions that acted as a ‘proving ground’ for my leadership capabilities; to foster and nurture the traits and virtues a leader must have.  In those positions, my leadership knowledge, skills and talents became stronger.  Most importantly, I learned about people, and they learned about me.  Quite honestly, I learned about me.  Ultimately, I earned the trust and confidence of my superiors, and I was promoted into middle and upper management.  20 years later, I have grown as a leader.  And, to answer my original question, I was inspired to become a leader by some very special managers and leaders early in my career.  Everything else was hard work and determination. 

How about you?  Were you inspired to become a leader?  Or, were you simply promoted into a leadership position?  I look forward to learning about you and your path to success.

In Memory of Dr. Stephen R. Covey (1932 – 2012)

Posted in Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , , , , , on July 17, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

A Guest Post by David Marquet

Stephen Covey rides USS Santa Fe with commanding officer David Marquet in 2000.

Stephen Covey’s Ride on the USS Santa Fe

By David Marquet

With sadness, we learn of the passing of Stephen Covey [yesterday], age 79.

Stephen had a tremendous impact not only on my life, but, through me, on the lives of those I had the privilege to lead. It started indirectly, when, after a period of reflection and tough going, I discovered The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. The overall approach of private victory, then public victory, describing our growth as proceeding from dependence through independence to interdependence, struck me as incredibly simple, yet powerful. I applied what I learned to my life immediately.

Later, when assigned to command the USS Santa Fe, I applied his 7 Habits approach at the organizational level. I gave every officer and chief who reported a copy of his book. We would have seminars discussing the various habits, and the application of those habits made Santa Fe a more effective submarine.

It turned out that Stephen was doing some work for the navy and learned about what we were doing on Santa Fe. He expressed an interest in riding the ship and the navy set it up. We were scheduled to conduct a one-day transit from the port of Lahaina, on the neighboring island of Maui, back to Pearl Harbor. This would be a perfect time for him to ride. It was also when we had set up a family member cruise and were expecting about 80 family members to ride, as well.

I was apprehensive about having both events at the same time. I thought the presence of the family members would present a distorted picture of how Santa Fe operated. Further, I wasn’t sure how I’d appropriately apportion my time between running Santa Fe, Stephen, and the family members.

It worked out perfectly! Stephen was working on a book for families and held a special talk just for the family members. His message was that they played a critically important role in the success of the ship, and placed high value on family. It was a win-win.

Stephen Covey addresses family members aboard USS Santa Fe

Stephen Covey addresses family members aboard USS Santa Fe

Stephen spent the entire day onboard, talking with crew members, looking through the periscope and driving the ship. He was tremendously interested in the people, and how they worked together. Everyone he talked to felt better about themselves afterward, especially me.

Stephen Covey at the helm of USS Santa Fe

Stephen Covey at the helm of USS Santa Fe

He remained interested in how Santa Fe did and was happy to hear of the subsequent successes the ship had, including the selection of 9 of the officers for submarine command. I was honored that he included USS Santa Fe in his book, The Eight Habit, and agreed to write the forward to Turn the Ship Around!

In the control room of USS Santa Fe with Stephen Covey

Stephen, thank you for your influence, clear thinking, and enthusiasm for life. We will miss you. (1)

Learning from Stephen Covey aboard USS Santa Fe

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[Stephen Covey rode the USS Santa Fe with commanding officer David Marquet in 2000]

*Reprinted with permission from the blog, Leader-Leader, by L. David Marquet.  Originally posted on July 16, 2012.

Copyright © 2012 by Louis David Marquet.

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Throughout his career, Dr. Covey had many unique and fascinating experiences.  Dr. Covey chronicled his time spent on the USS Santa Fe with Captain Marquet.  Here is what Dr. Covey wrote about that experience:

I was training U.S. Navy officers in leadership during the dot.com era, when someone told me about an exemplary leader named Captain David Marquet, Captain of the U.S.S. Santa Fe, who never lost anyone, in spite of the hellish conditions submarine personnel are required to endure.

An opportunity arose, which I jumped at. I was invited to board Captain Marquet’s sub and interview him. Never before had I observed such empowerment. We stood on the bridge of this multibillion-dollar nuclear submarine with a football field of vessel in front of and behind us. A young officer approached the Captain and said, “Sir, I intend to take this ship down 400 feet.” Captain Marquet asked about the sonar and sounding and then instructed this young man to give us another twenty minutes on the bridge before carrying out his intention.

Throughout the day, people approached the captain intending to do this or do that. The Captain would sometimes ask a question or two, but then say, “Very well.” He reserved only the top decisions for his own confirmation and empowered others to make the rest. He said he wanted to empower his people as far as he possibly could within the Navy’s confines. He felt if he required them to own the problem and the solution to it, they would begin to view themselves as a vitally important link in the chain of command. He created a culture where those sailors had a real sense of adding value.

Months after my sub ride, Captain Marquet wrote to inform me that the U.S.S. Santa Fe was awarded the Arleigh Burke Trophy for most improved submarine, ship, or aviation squadron in the Pacific. (2)

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If you liked this post, you’ll definitely like this post —> Some Final Thoughts from Dr. Stephen R. Covey

Related Articles:

“I Intend To” – More Than a Recommendation (championsclubcommunity.com)

What I Learned from Stephen Covey: Begin with the End in Mind (posted 18 July 2012) (leader-leader.com/blog)

How We Made Leader to Leader Work on Santa Fe – By David Adams (leader-leader.com/blog)

Good to Great (A Submariner’s Profile in Empowerment) (commandperformanceleadership.wordpress.com)

Turn The Ship Around!: A Captain’s Guide to Creating Leadership at Every Level (commandperformanceleadership.wordpress.com)

Up Scope! (commandperformanceleadership.wordpress.com)

Teach Your People to “Think Out Loud” to Enable Them to Maintain Control (commandperformanceleadership.wordpress.com)

Sources:

(1) Stephen Covey’s Ride on the USS Santa Fehttp://leader-leader.com/blog/2012/07/16/stephen-covey-tribute-uss-santa-fe/ – Accessed 16 July 2012 – Leader-Leader The Movement – http://leader-leader.com/blog/

(2) About Dr. Covey – Career Highlightshttps://www.stephencovey.com/about/career.php – Accessed 16 July 2012 – Stephen R. Covey (website) – https://www.stephencovey.com/

Quote of the Day By General John A. Lejeune

Posted in Leadership, Quote of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 21, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

13th Commandant of the Marine Corps
(1867 – 1942)

“Leadership is the sum of those qualities of intellect, human understanding, and moral character that enables a person to inspire and control a group of people successfully.”

Lieutenant General John A. Lejeune

EGA

 

Congratulations, You’ve Graduated College! Now What?

Posted in Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 15, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

Larry Winget, author of Shut Up, Stop Whining, And Get A Life, appeared on Fox & Friends this morning (Tuesday, May 15).  He gave the following speech:

Congratulations on earning your degree. But the truth is that the degree alone isn’t going to be enough to assure your success in the real world.

In the real world employers don’t care much about your degree, your happiness, your income or really much of anything that has to do with you. They care about what you can do for them. And from this point on, that’s how you have to think. Businesses exist to be profitable. It is your job to help make them profitable. If you know how to do that, how to be worth more than you cost, then you have value in the workplace. If you don’t know how to be worth more than you cost, then employers will pass you over and find someone else.

Look at what it really takes to be successful in the real world.

You have to take responsibility. Your life, your results, your success, happiness, health and prosperity are up to you. When it turns out well, you get the credit and when it doesn’t work out the way you wanted it to, you get the blame. It isn’t up to anyone else to make sure you are successful, it’s always up to you, so be responsible.

Others. Respect your employer enough to be on time and give them your personal best every day because that is what they are paying for. Respect your boss, even when you think he is an idiot because he is still your boss and deserves your respect. Respect your coworkers so they will respect you and your customers because they pay you.

Clear priorities. Your time, your energy and your money will always go to what is important to you. If looking cute is important to you then you will spend all of your money at the mall. If being financially secure is important to you then you will make sure that you save, invest and live on less than you earn.

It’s about work and excellence. Regardless of what others may tell you, it’s not about your passion — as I know people who are passionately incompetent. It’s not loving what you do or being happy every day. You aren’t paid to be happy on the job, you are paid to do your job. Success always comes down to hard work and excellence. And it takes both. Hard work alone won’t cut it. I know people who work really hard yet aren’t any good at what they do so it doesn’t matter. And I know people who are excellent at what they do but they don’t work hard enough at it to make any difference.

So work hard and be excellent at what you do. And remember, if any one can do it then anyone can do it.

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PDF Transcript: http://larrywinget.com/pdf/2012-graduates.pdf

In addition to the YouTube video above, you can see the video of Larry Winget’s speech, please go HERE.  And, another source for this video can be found HERE.

Larry WingetLarry Winget is a five-time New York Times/Wall Street Journal bestselling author. He is a member of the International Speaker Hall Of Fame. He has starred in his own television series and appeared in national television commercials. Larry is a regular contributor on many news shows on the topics of money, personal success and business.

Text Source –

Larry Winget’s Advice for Grads – By Larry Winget – Published May 15, 2012 – http://www.foxnews.com/on-air/fox-friends/transcript/larry-wingets-advice-grads – Accessed 15 May 2012 – Fox & Friends – Fox News – http://www.foxnews.com/

Video Sources –

Larry Winget’s Advice for Grads – Fox & Friends – Posted May 15, 2012 – http://www.foxnews.com/on-air/fox-friends/index.html#/v/1640428610001/larry-wingets-advice-for-grads/?playlist_id=86912 – Accessed 15 May 2012 – http://www.foxnews.com/

Conservative Author Gives Least Inspirational Graduation Speech Ever On Fox & Friends – By Noah Rothman – Posted May 15, 2012 (9:34am) – Mediaite TV – http://www.mediaite.com/tv/conservative-author-gives-least-inspirational-graduation-speech-ever-on-fox-friends/ – Accessed 15 May 2012 – Mediaite – http://www.mediaite.com/

Don’t Miss Your Life

Posted in Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 10, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

I seldom want to deviate from the true premise of this blog, but I came across a song that I must share with you.  It’s a song in the spirit of other songs like, “Cats In the Cradle” written by Harry Chapin and a version sung by Cat Stevens, and Bob Carlisle’s, “Butterfly Kisses.”

The title of this post and the song itself say a lot.  When you view the video, read the words and take in the message of Phil Vassar’s song, “Don’t Miss Your Life,” you’ll begin to think about your own life; past, present and future; especially, if you have children young or old.

The Message: Don’t miss a minute of your life…your family’s life…your friend’s life.  STOP ~ enjoy ~ savor ~ fulfill ~ experience LIFE.  I am certain that you are missing more than you think.  I know I am.  There is much to take away from this song, and I hope whatever you take away is put to good and loving use.

Please enjoy Phil Vassar’s “Don’t Miss Your Life”

A United States Marine Corps MBA

Posted in Quote of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , on May 9, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

Quote of the Day

Robert J. Stevens

“I did not learn about leadership in business school. I learned about leadership when I was 18 years-old and first introduced to the United States Marine Corps, where leadership is not taught by a favored professor in a three-credit hour course.  It is taught by every officer and every NCO in every minute and every hour of every day, in every action, every word, every deed, and every circumstance.  And, in that experience, you are immersed in a culture of excellence that is built on a foundation of virtue and value.”

Robert J. Stevens, Chairman & Chief Executive Officer of Lockheed Martin, and United States Marine Corps Veteran

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Robert J. Stevens Mini Biography

Robert Stevens, at age 18, enlisted in the United States Marine Corps after graduation from McKeesport High School in western Pennsylvania in 1969. He reported to Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island and graduated as the Outstanding Marine of Platoon 3073. He also was the recipient of the Outstanding Recruit Award for the 3d Battalion given by Leatherneck Magazine. Based upon Mr. Stevens’ performance in boot camp, he was meritoriously promoted to lance corporal.

Upon completion of training as a forward observer at Camp Lejeune, Mr. Stevens was assigned to the 2d Field Artillery Group, FMF Atlantic and subsequently transferred to WESTPAC where he joined 3d Battalion, 12th Marines in Okinawa. While with 3/12, Mr. Stevens was assigned to an infantry company in 2d Battalion, 4th Marines, and as part of the Special Landing Force, traveled to Vietnam and the Philippines. In 1972, he finished his two years of active duty with the III Marine Amphibious Force, FMF Pacific and was honorably discharged in 1975 with the rank of corporal.

Following active duty, Mr. Stevens enrolled in Slippery Rock University and graduated summa cum laude in 1976 receiving the Distinguished Alumni Award. He subsequently received graduate degrees in engineering and management from the Polytechnic University of New York, and, with a Fairchild Fellowship, earned a master’s degree in business from Columbia University while pursuing a very distinguished career in the aerospace defense industry culminating as chairman, president and CEO of the Lockheed Martin Corporation, retiring in 2013.[i]

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Marine Corps Heritage Foundation Award

Robert J. Stevens’ remarks at the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation Awards Dinner receiving The General John A. LeJeune Recognition for Exemplary Leadership on April 28, 2010

Developing Leaders: Perspectives from Lockheed Martin

Bob Stevens, Chairman and CEO of Lockheed Martin, talks about the strategy for developing leaders. Stevens was a keynote speaker at the Center for Leadership, Innovation and Change (CLIC) launch on October 1, 2010

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Source and Footnote –

* Inspiration for this post came from reading an article on CNN Money entitled, “10 Fortune 500 Military CEOs.”  Robert J. Stevens’ frame can be found HERE.

[i] Chairman Robert J. Stevens – 2017 Admiral of the Navy George Dewey Award – Naval Order of the United States – http://www.navalorder.org/awards/2017/7/22-chairman-robert-j-stevens-2017-admiral-of-the-navy-george-dewey-award – Accessed 10 November 2017 – http://www.navalorder.org/

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Related Articles –

Robert J. Stevens, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer – Biography (via Lockheed Martin website – http://www.lockheedmartin.com/)
Leadership as a Verb (Speech text) (Remarks By Robert J. Stevens, upon receiving the 2004 ‘Executive of the Year’ Award from the National Management Association, November 1, 2004) (via Lockheed Martin – Speeches at www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/speeches.html)
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