Archive for Marine Corps

To All Veterans on This Veterans Day…

Posted in Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 11, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

veterans-day-images-free

THANK YOU!!!

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Freedom isn’t free.  Men and women throughout our history have paid the price, sometimes the ultimate price of their lives, to ensure your life of freedom is preserved for you now and long into the future.  On this Veterans Day, we honor…we thank…we celebrate their courage, commitment and sacrifice for us; your fellow Americans.

Thank a Veteran today! Thank them for paving the road to continued freedom and fighting to ensure that our Country’s ideals are secured.  We owe them more than a dedicated day on the calendar.

Freedom Isn’t Free

And, this is why they fight and why we honor:

For freedom, they stand and fight:

The 237th Birthday of the United States Marine Corps

Posted in Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , , , on November 10, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

USMC logo.svgThere are few who are as true to the core,  who are so tremendously proud to serve their Country, as those of the United States Marine Corps.  If you have known, have met, served with, or served as a Marine, you know what I mean.  Today is the Marine Corps’ 237th Birthday, and they deserve to be honored and celebrated today.  On November 10, 1775, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Captain Samuel Nicholas formed two battalions of Continental Marines as naval infantry.  I dedicate this message to all U.S. Marines; retired, active duty, reserve, and those who aspire to become Marines.  HAPPY BIRTHDAY, OORAH and SEMPER FI!!!

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“Some people wonder all their lives if they’ve made a difference.  The Marines don’t have that problem.”

President Ronald Wilson Reagan

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FOR HONOR

FOR COUNTRY

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2012 Marine Corps Birthday Message

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Warriors of Honor, Courage and Commitment

Becoming a warrior means joining a brotherhood, forged in the crucible of training and proven on the battlefield.  A true warrior is measured not only by his strength, but his honor.  No battle is ever won alone.  Warriors never rest.  Anyone can follow a path; Few make their own.  Every warrior lives for the fight.  For there is always another battle waiting to be fought and won.

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United States Marine Corps 237th Birthday Tribute 2012 | Official GoDaddy.com Video

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Index of Marine Corps-related Blog Posts on Command Performance Leadership:

A United States Marine Corps MBA

Inspirational Wisdom from a War-Hardened Marine Corps Officer

Making Marine Corps Officers

How Would the Marines Run Your Business?

Quote of the Day By General John A. Lejeune

Leading the Charge: Leadership Lessons from the Battlefield to the Boardroom

Decision-Making in the New ‘Leadership Organization’

Improvise, Adapt and Overcome ~ Changing Plans, But Not Changing Vision

Putting the Principles into Practice

The United States Marine Corps Roadside Assistance Service

Quote of the Day By General John A. Lejeune

Posted in Leadership, Quote of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 21, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

13th Commandant of the Marine Corps
(1867 – 1942)

“Leadership is the sum of those qualities of intellect, human understanding, and moral character that enables a person to inspire and control a group of people successfully.”

Lieutenant General John A. Lejeune

EGA

 

Messages from the Top of the Department of Defense for Armed Forces Day/Month

Posted in Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , , , , , , on May 19, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

Armed Forces Day

Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta Armed Forces Day Message

“Let me take this opportunity to wish all of our troops and their families the very best on this Armed Forces Day. I hope you know that all Americans join me in gratitude for everything you do to keep us safe. Wherever and however you serve, you are an inspiration to me and to millions of your fellow Americans.

“President Truman was right to recognize this day, and even more right when he said that it is ‘not enough to yearn for peace. We must work, and if necessary, fight for it.’

“You fight for peace so that others don’t need to. You work for peace, at home and abroad, so that others may know a better life. Your families share in that labor and in that sacrifice, so that other families need not endure the pains of separation and of strife. There is perhaps no more admirable calling.

“In keeping with that same spirit of service and leadership, heads of state from across the world are joining together at the NATO Summit in Chicago to affirm our shared commitment to work and to fight to achieve our objectives in Afghanistan.

“Our goal is clear: to ensure that Afghanistan will never again serve as a launching pad for terrorist attacks against our homeland. To do that, we have to build an Afghanistan that can secure and govern itself.

“Thanks to your service and that of your international and Afghan partners, we are closer to achieving these goals than we ever have been before. Al Qaeda’s leadership has been decimated, the Taliban’s momentum has been thrust back, and the Afghan National Security Forces are increasingly in the lead.

“In the past year, I have had the opportunity to meet thousands of you at installations across the globe. As the war in Afghanistan draws towards its conclusion, you still face difficult tasks ahead. But every day I serve as Secretary of Defense, I have been amazed and impressed by your grit and determination, and your resilience. It’s the same grit that won the day at Gettysburg, that scaled the cliffs at Pointe Du Hoc, that sunk four enemy carriers at Midway, that broke the enemy’s back at Inchon and broke through the Berlin blockade.

“You stand on broad shoulders — a legacy of courage going back to this nation’s founding. Yet you have set a new standard while carrying a heavy burden over the last decade of war.

“As Americans take this Armed Forces Day to reflect on your service and that of your loved ones, I hope they also find new ways to show you the admiration and the respect you have so rightly earned. You have made our nation stronger and safer over the past decade of war, and whether in uniform or out, I know that you will continue to lead this country and never stop working to fulfill the dream of giving our children a better life.”

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Source –

Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta Armed Forces Day Message – Press Release No. 401-12 – Posted May 18, 2012 – http://www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=15292 – Accessed 19 May 2012 – U.S. Department of Defense – http://www.defense.gov/
 
Related Articles –
 
Panetta Praises Troops on Armed Forces Day
 
Armed Forces Salute (commandperformanceleadership.wordpress.com)
 
Armed Forces Day ~ May 19, 2012 (commandperformanceleadership.wordpress.com)

Armed Forces Day ~ May 19, 2012

Posted in Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 19, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

Salute Our Military: Armed Forces Day Is May 19, 2012

On August 31, 1949, Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson announced the creation of an Armed Forces Day to replace separate Army, Navy and Air Force Days. The single-day celebration stemmed from the unification of the Armed Forces under one department — the Department of Defense. Each of the military leagues and orders was asked to drop sponsorship of its specific service day in order to celebrate the newly announced Armed Forces Day. The Army, Navy and Air Force leagues adopted the newly formed day. The Marine Corps League declined to drop support for Marine Corps Day but supports Armed Forces Day, too.

In a speech announcing the formation of the day, President Truman “praised the work of the military services at home and across the seas” and said, “it is vital to the security of the nation and to the establishment of a desirable peace.” In an excerpt from the Presidential Proclamation of Feb. 27, 1950, Mr. Truman stated:

“Armed Forces Day, Saturday, May 20, 1950, marks the first combined demonstration by America’s defense team of its progress, under the National Security Act, towards the goal of readiness for any eventuality. It is the first parade of preparedness by the unified forces of our land, sea, and air defense”.

The theme of the first Armed Forces Day was “Teamed for Defense.” It was chosen as a means of expressing the unification of all the military forces under a single department of the government. Although this was the theme for the day, there were several other purposes for holding Armed Forces Day. It was a type of “educational program for civilians,” one in which there would be an increased awareness of the Armed Forces. It was designed to expand public understanding of what type of job is performed and the role of the military in civilian life. It was a day for the military to show “state-of- the-art” equipment to the civilian population they were protecting. And it was a day to honor and acknowledge the people of the Armed Forces of the United States.

According to a New York Times article published on May 17, 1952: “This is the day on which we have the welcome opportunity to pay special tribute to the men and women of the Armed Forces … to all the individuals who are in the service of their country all over the world. Armed Forces Day won’t be a matter of parades and receptions for a good many of them. They will all be in line of duty and some of them may give their lives in that duty.”

The first Armed Forces Day was celebrated by parades, open houses, receptions, and air shows. In Washington D.C., 10,000 troops of all branches of the military, cadets, and veterans marched pass the President and his party. In Berlin, 1,000 U.S. troops paraded for the German citizens at Templehof Airfield. In New York City, an estimated 33,000 participants initiated Armed Forces Day “under an air cover of 250 military planes of all types.” In the harbors across the country were the famed mothballed “battlewagons” of World War II, the Missouri, the New Jersey, the North Carolina, and the Iowa, all open for public inspection. Precision flying teams dominated the skies as tracking radar were exhibited on the ground. All across the country, the American people joined together to honor the Armed Forces.

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Source –

Salute Our Military: Armed Forces Day Is May 19, 2012http://www.ourmilitary.mil/hot-topic/salute-our-military-armed-forces-day-is-may-19-2012/ – Accessed 19 May 2012 – OurMilitary.mil – http://www.ourmilitary.mil/

Related Article –

Armed Forces Salute

Armed Forces Salute

Posted in Video of the Week with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 18, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

Armed Forces week has marched along, culminating in the honoring of our military tomorrow; Armed Forces Day (May 19, 2012).  I wanted to kick off this blog’s commemoration of Armed Forces Day with a tribute to the brave men and women who have sacrificed so much to preserve and protect our country.  In this video, The West Virginia University Band presents our “Armed Forces Salute,” which features a medley of the songs from all branches of our great military, as well as a very special field show that will absolutely amaze you; truly fascinating what they do in this video.  Enjoy!!!

The United States Marine Corps Roadside Assistance Service

Posted in Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 14, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

Marine Corps

Dial 1-800-OORAH for immediate roadside assistance for any crisis you are in.

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Marines, CRW practice for 2012 JB MDL open house

5/10/2012 – A U.S. Marine Corps CH-53E Super Stallion from Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 772 conducts slingload operations with Airmen from the 621st Contingency Response Wing at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J., May 10. Both units were preparing for a Marine airpower demonstration at the 2012 JB MDL Open House and & Air Show, scheduled for May 12 and 13. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Parker Gyokeres)

Sources –

Photos: Marines, CRW practice for 2012 JB MDL open house – http://www.amc.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/144956/photos-marines-crw-practice-for-2012-jb-mdl-open-house/ – Accessed 10 November 2017 – Air Mobility Command – http://www.amc.af.mil/

A United States Marine Corps MBA

Posted in Quote of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , on May 9, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

Quote of the Day

Robert J. Stevens

“I did not learn about leadership in business school. I learned about leadership when I was 18 years-old and first introduced to the United States Marine Corps, where leadership is not taught by a favored professor in a three-credit hour course.  It is taught by every officer and every NCO in every minute and every hour of every day, in every action, every word, every deed, and every circumstance.  And, in that experience, you are immersed in a culture of excellence that is built on a foundation of virtue and value.”

Robert J. Stevens, Chairman & Chief Executive Officer of Lockheed Martin, and United States Marine Corps Veteran

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Robert J. Stevens Mini Biography

Robert Stevens, at age 18, enlisted in the United States Marine Corps after graduation from McKeesport High School in western Pennsylvania in 1969. He reported to Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island and graduated as the Outstanding Marine of Platoon 3073. He also was the recipient of the Outstanding Recruit Award for the 3d Battalion given by Leatherneck Magazine. Based upon Mr. Stevens’ performance in boot camp, he was meritoriously promoted to lance corporal.

Upon completion of training as a forward observer at Camp Lejeune, Mr. Stevens was assigned to the 2d Field Artillery Group, FMF Atlantic and subsequently transferred to WESTPAC where he joined 3d Battalion, 12th Marines in Okinawa. While with 3/12, Mr. Stevens was assigned to an infantry company in 2d Battalion, 4th Marines, and as part of the Special Landing Force, traveled to Vietnam and the Philippines. In 1972, he finished his two years of active duty with the III Marine Amphibious Force, FMF Pacific and was honorably discharged in 1975 with the rank of corporal.

Following active duty, Mr. Stevens enrolled in Slippery Rock University and graduated summa cum laude in 1976 receiving the Distinguished Alumni Award. He subsequently received graduate degrees in engineering and management from the Polytechnic University of New York, and, with a Fairchild Fellowship, earned a master’s degree in business from Columbia University while pursuing a very distinguished career in the aerospace defense industry culminating as chairman, president and CEO of the Lockheed Martin Corporation, retiring in 2013.[i]

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Marine Corps Heritage Foundation Award

Robert J. Stevens’ remarks at the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation Awards Dinner receiving The General John A. LeJeune Recognition for Exemplary Leadership on April 28, 2010

Developing Leaders: Perspectives from Lockheed Martin

Bob Stevens, Chairman and CEO of Lockheed Martin, talks about the strategy for developing leaders. Stevens was a keynote speaker at the Center for Leadership, Innovation and Change (CLIC) launch on October 1, 2010

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Source and Footnote –

* Inspiration for this post came from reading an article on CNN Money entitled, “10 Fortune 500 Military CEOs.”  Robert J. Stevens’ frame can be found HERE.

[i] Chairman Robert J. Stevens – 2017 Admiral of the Navy George Dewey Award – Naval Order of the United States – http://www.navalorder.org/awards/2017/7/22-chairman-robert-j-stevens-2017-admiral-of-the-navy-george-dewey-award – Accessed 10 November 2017 – http://www.navalorder.org/

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Related Articles –

Robert J. Stevens, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer – Biography (via Lockheed Martin website – http://www.lockheedmartin.com/)
Leadership as a Verb (Speech text) (Remarks By Robert J. Stevens, upon receiving the 2004 ‘Executive of the Year’ Award from the National Management Association, November 1, 2004) (via Lockheed Martin – Speeches at www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/speeches.html)

Inspirational Wisdom from a War-Hardened Marine Corps Officer

Posted in Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , , , , on March 21, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

“I like Marines, because being a Marine is serious business.  We’re not a social club or a fraternal organization and we don’t pretend to be one.  We’re a brotherhood of “Warriors” – Nothing more, nothing less, pure and simple.  We are in the ass-kicking business, and unfortunately, these days business is good.”

Colonel James M. Lowe, Commander, Marine Corps Base Quantico, 2004

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Marine Corps officers are straight shooters; especially the old, salty ones.  They’re straight shooters with their rifles and with their mouth.  We can learn a lot about leadership, integrity, honor and courage, among other valuable topics, from Marines and Marine Corps officers.

As I was researching for some inspiring Marine Corps messages and quotations, I stumbled on a speech presented by Colonel James M. Lowe, former Commander of the Marine Corps base in Quantico, Virginia.  I could not find very much biographical information about Colonel Lowe.  However, I did find the following:

Colonel James M. Lowe

Colonel James M. Lowe

Colonel James M. Lowe was commissioned a second lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps in 1976 through the NROTC program upon graduation from the University of South Carolina.  Col. Lowe embarked on an illustrious military career during which, among varied assignments, he served as an Infantry Officer with the 3rd Marine Division, 2nd Battalion, 4, in Okinawa, Japan; was a Series Officer and Personnel Officer at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina; completed a tour of duty in Beirut, Lebanon with the Multi-National Peacekeeping Force; and was assigned to Special Operations Command-Europe in Stuttgart, Germany.  Col. Lowe earned personal awards including the Legion of Merit, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal with Gold Star, Joint Service Commendation Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, and Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal with Gold Star.  Col. Lowe assumed his duties as Base Commander, Marine Corps Base, Quantico, on August 22, 2003.  Col. Lowe, now retired, made eight Marine expeditionary unit deployments, served with the Special Operations Command, and undergone every level of professional military education possible to hone his warfighting skills.

In this speech, Col. Lowe presents his insights and experiences as a leader of Marines during his 28-year career.  The speech was delivered at The Basic School at Marine Corps Base Quantico, and was dubbed the ‘Mess Night’ speech to Charlie Company at a formal ‘dining in’ event.  Through my research of this speech, I could not find the actual date it was delivered, although it appears it may have been delivered late last year.  Regardless of when Col. Lowe delivered this speech, his words and wisdom is timeless.

There are various sources for the transcript of this speech; sources that are also good blog spots on the web.  I present a few of them at the end of this post.  What I wanted to do here is present some poignant highlights of the speech that will both inspire you and fire you up; no matter if you are a Marine or not.  You can find the entire transcript of the speech via Marine Corps Web Log, as well as other links listed at the end of this post.  Please note that what I have summarized below are pieced-together excerpts from the speech.

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“Basically, I was told to talk about what I have learned over the last 28 years of leading Marines. Well, I have only learned eight things, and it will only take me about 60 seconds to share them with you.

Now that I think of it, if I had been invited to speak to you the day Charlie Company formed up, I could have probably saved you six months of TBS training.

I thought I would get this structured portion out of the way up front so I could talk about anything I want to, so here goes.

1. Seek brilliance in the basics, always do the right thing, and have a plan to kill everyone you meet.

2. If you are riding at the head of the herd, look back every now and then and make sure it is still there.

3. Never enter an hour-long firefight with 5 minutes of ammo.

4. This one is really important for all of you born North of Washington, DC. Never, never kick a cow chip on a hot day.

5. If you’re not shooting, and I can see by your marksmanship badges that some of you are challenged in this area, you better be communicating or reloading for another Marine.

6. There are three types of leaders. Those who learn from reading, those who learn from observation, and those who still have to touch the electric fence to get the message.

7. Anything worth shooting is worth shooting twice. Ammo is cheap.

8. And finally, you might want to write this one down: Never slap a grown man who has a mouth full of chewing tobacco

I have a few minutes left; so let’s talk about something I like…Marines. Up front, let me tell you how much I admire you. Why is that? Unlike the vast majority of your fellow citizens, you stepped forward and committed yourself to a greater cause without concern for your personal safety or comfort. And you did it knowing that you would gain nothing in return. Except the honor and cherished privilege of earning the title of “Marine Officer”.

Individually, you are as different as apples and oranges, but you are linked for eternity by the title “Marine” and the fact that you are part of the finest fighting force that has ever existed in history.

If you haven’t picked up on it, I like being a Marine and I like being around Marines.

So what is it that I like about Marines? This is the easy part!

I like the fact that you always know where you stand with a Marine! With Marines, there is no middle ground or gray area. There are only missions, objectives and facts.

I like the fact that if you are a self-declared enemy of America, that running into a Marine outfit in combat is your worst nightmare, and that your health record is about to get a lot thicker or be closed out entirely!

I like the fact that Marines are steadfast and consistent in everything they do. Regardless of whether you agree with them or not; that Marines hold the term “politically correct” with nothing but pure disdain; that Marines stand tall and rigid in their actions, thoughts and deeds when others bend with the direction of the wind and are as confused as a dog looking at a ceiling fan!

I like the fact that each and every Marine considers the honor and legacy of the Corps as his personal and sacred trust to protect and defend.

I like the fact that most civilians don’t have a clue what makes us tick! And that’s not a bad thing. Because if they did, it would scare the hell out of them!

I like the fact that others say they want to be like us, but don’t have what it takes in the “pain-gain-pride” department to make it happen.

I like the fact that the Marines came into being in a bar, Tun Tavern, and that Marines still gather in pubs, bars and slop chutes to share sea stories and hot scoop.

I like our motto: Semper Fidelis, and the fact that we don’t shed it when the going gets tough, the battlefield gets deadly or when we hang up our uniform for the last time.

I like the fact that Marines take care of each other. In combat and in time of peace.

I like the fact that Marines consider the term “Marines take care of their own” as meaning we will give up our very life for our fellow Marines, if necessary.

I like the fact that Marines know the difference between “chicken salad” and “chicken shit” and aren’t afraid to call either for what it is!

I like the fact that Marines have never failed the people of America and that we don’t use the words “can’t”, “retreat”, or “lose”.

I like the fact that the people of America hold Marines in the highest esteem and that they know that they can count on us to locate, close with and destroy those who would harm them! I like Marines. And being around Marines.

I like the fact that a couple of years ago an elected member of congress felt compelled to publicly accuse the Marine Corps of being “radical and extreme”. I like the fact that our Commandant informed that member of congress that he was absolutely correct and that he passed on his thanks for the compliment.

I like the fact that Marine leaders — of every rank— know that issuing every man and woman a black beret — or polka-dotted boxer shorts for that matter— does absolutely nothing to promote morale, fighting spirit or combat effectiveness.

I like the fact that Marines are Marines first. Regardless of age, race, creed, color, sex, national origin or how long they served or what goals they achieve in life!

Here is one thing I have learned for sure over the last 28 years. The years fly by, names change, the weapons and the gear change, political leaders and agendas change, national priorities and budgets change, the threats to our nation change. But through it all, there is one abiding constant —- the basic issue, do-or-die Marine.

He or she will do damn near anything asked, under terrible conditions, with better results and fewer complaints than any civilized human being should have reason to expect. And we, who have the privilege of serving them and leading them, make our plans and execute crucial missions based primarily on one fact of life. That the basic Marine will not fail his country, his Corps and his fellow Marines. That they will overcome any threat. If allowed to do so.

Think about that and remember that for 228 years it has worked and it has kept the wolf away from America’s door. I like Marines, because being a Marine is serious business. We’re not a social club or a fraternal organization and we don’t pretend to be. We’re a brotherhood of “warriors” — nothing more, nothing less, pure and simple.

We are in the ass-kicking business, and unfortunately, these days business is good. But don’t worry about that. What you need to remember is that the mere association of the word “Marine” with a crisis is an automatic source of confidence to America, and encouragement to all nations who stand with us. As Marines, our message to our foes has always been essentially the same. “We own this side of the street! Threaten my country or our allies and we will come over to your side of the street, burn your hut down, and whisper in your ear “can you hear me now?” And then secure your heartbeat.

Regardless of what MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code) you now have, if you don’t already know it, being a leader of Marines is about as much fun as you can legally have with your clothes on! And that’s true regardless if you are a grunt, datadink, sparkchaser, stewburner, wiredog, buttplate, remington raider, rotorhead, legal beagle, fast stick, cannon cocker, track head, skivvie stacker, dual fool or a boxkicker. And if you don’t believe it you will! Trust me!

Why is that? Because each of us fought to gain the coveted title “Marine”, it wasn’t given to us. We earned it. And on the day we finally became Marines, an eternal flame of devotion and fierce pride was ignited in our souls.

You have some challenging times and emotional events ahead of you. I am not talking about tomorrow morning’s headache. I am talking about the fact that the world is a dangerous place and as leaders of Marines, you will be walking point on world events.

Make sure you keep that flame that I mentioned earlier burning brightly. It will keep you warm when times are hard. It will provide light in the darkest of nights. Use it and draw strength from it, as generations of leathernecks have done since our beginning.

For those of you who are wondering, “Am I up to it?” forget it. You will be magnificent, just as Marine officers always have been. I realize that many of your young Marines are going to be “been there, done that” warriors and that they will wear the decorations to prove it. But you need to know, that they respect you and admire you. You need to know that they want and need your leadership. All you have to do is never fail them in this regard and everything will turn out great. Hold up your end of the bargain and they will not fail.

Long live the United States. And success to the Marine Corps!”

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Related Articles –

*Some very good USMC blogs and sites*

Col. Mike Lowe’s Mess Night Speech (usmc81.com)

Col. Mike Lowe’s Speech at Quantico (grunt.com)

Colonel Mike Lowe’s Mess Night Speech at Charlie Company TBS (onemarinesview.com)

Long Live the United States.  And Success to the Marine Corps (leadingmarines.com)

Long Ago and Far Away I was in a “Charlie Company” at TBS Quantico (v4asa.org/v4ablog)

Long Live the United States.  And Success to the Marine Corps – Colonel Mike Lowe’s Mess Night Speech at Charlie Company TBS via  Maritime Expeditionary Security Squadron 11 Det Foxtrot on Facebook

Making Marine Corps Officers

Posted in Leadership with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 5, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

Listen to THIS while reading this post!!!

Officer Candidates School

“Ductus Exemplo” – Lead by Example

HONOR ~ COURAGE ~ COMMITMENT

The mission of Marine Corps Officer Candidates School (OCS) is “to train, evaluate, and screen officer candidates to ensure they possess the moral, intellectual, and physical qualities for commissioning, and the leadership potential to serve successfully as company grade officers in the operating forces”[i] of the United States Marine Corps.  OCS in the Marine Corps focusses on the candidate becoming a follower first, and then a leader.  The training is individualized, and centered on the candidate’s initiative to get the mission accomplished.  OCS puts them into scenarios where the candidate has to take charge, and where they have to lead.  Among many other things, OCS teaches the candidates:

  • How to act
  • How to conduct themselves as officers
  • How to be physically fit
  • How to establish a command presence (bearing)
  • How to lead by example
  • How to lead Marines
  • How to be confident
  • The ability to make quick, rapid decisions in a time compressed environment under pressure

Leading by example, and leading from the front, are two of the most important attributes of a United States Marine Corps officer.  At OCS, this is instilled in them very early and very quickly in their training.  Along with that comes the willingness to do the things that you asking your people to do.  You can’t ask your people to do something that you are not willing to do yourself.

The officer candidates are evaluated on if they are able to think and make decisions on their own, their ability to get their company from point A to point B, their ability to communicate, and their overall leadership capabilities.

Marine Corps officers must have integrity; to do the right things when nobody is looking.  They must conduct themselves as professionals at all times.

A leader in the Marine Corps needs to be humble and treat people with respect, no matter what rank they are.  It doesn’t matter what job you have, or what rank you are, the Marine Corps places a premium on leadership; from the private to the four-star general.  Officer Candidates School gives them an understanding of what basic leadership really is.  It not only provides them the leadership skills to be successful in the Marine Corps, but it prepares them for life.

Copyright © Dale R. Wilson

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Related Content –

Do’s and Don’t’s of Marine Corps OCS (officercandidatesschool.com)

The Ultimate OCS Preparation Workout (officercandidatesschool.com)

How Academics are Taught at OCS (officercandidatesschool.com)

OCS Academics Intro Leadership —> Introduction to Marine Corps Leadership (officercandidatesschool.com)

OCS Academics Leadership Fundamentals —> Fundamentals of Marine Corps Leadership (officercandidatesschool.com)

Marine Corps Officer Candidate School (outlawamerica.blogspot.com)


Footnote –

[i] “OCS Mission” – Officer Candidates School – http://www.trngcmd.usmc.mil/OCS/default.aspx – Accessed 5 March 2012 – United States Marine Corps Training Command (Quantico, Virginia) – http://www.trngcmd.usmc.mil/

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