Archive for Navy

A Foundation Built 30-Years Ago Today – August 22, 1986

Posted in Core Values with tags , , , , , , on August 21, 2016 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

Seal of RTC Great Lakes.pngKnown as The Quarterdeck of the Navy, Great Lakes Naval Training Center, in Waukegan, Illinois, is the Navy’s only basic training facility.  Affectionately called Great Mistakes[i] by many who have passed through its gates, Recruit Training Command (RTC) is where recruits begin their Navy experience.  They learn about naval history; become aware of a sailor’s standards of conduct and rights & responsibilities; become physically and fundamentally strong in the lifestyle of a sailor.  After this indoctrination, they’re ready for service as the Navy’s newest Blue Jackets.

It was the middle of June, 1986.  I had just arrived to RTC Great Lakes for basic training.  I was anxious and nervous; excited, yet uncertain.  So many thoughts were swirling in my mind.  After all, it’s a big step for a 17-year-old to take; exiting the safe bounds of home and community into the rigid uniformity and discipline of a military institution.

Navy boot camp is a basic naval orientation designed to transform men and women into smartly disciplined, physically fit, basically trained sailors.[ii]  As soon as one arrives, they are integrated into a diverse group of individuals with whom they will eat, sleep, learn, grow and support as a team until graduation day.  Teamwork is the foremost skill developed during these eight trying weeks.  The recruit company’s chain of command is quickly established, and the ship is underway.  Boot camp provides the opportunity to develop and refine leadership skills that will become vital in the fleet.

Although I felt ready to get it all started, I had to wait a few more days before starting my eight weeks of training; something about making sure I was healthy and fit for the rigors of Navy training.  For the first few days after arriving, we marching back and forth from RTC to Main Side for medical and administrative in-processing.  As I recall, it was more like determining how many holes I can withstand being punctured into my arm and buttocks.  It was also when I received my initial issuance of uniforms, and a clean-shaved head.  This week is known as Processing Week.  We called them P-Days; days that didn’t count towards the eight weeks of training.  Time just seemed to stop.

It rained during those first few days.  It seemed like the rain would never end.  Cold.  Damp.  Dreary.  Miserable.  Amidst the proverbial ‘hurry-up and wait,’ I was eager for the ‘hurry-up’ part to begin.  These early days at boot camp have become some of the more memorable days in my life.  I look back on them fondly.  They were, after all, the days that began to set the foundation for the rest of my life and career.

Today, August 22, marks the 30th anniversary of my graduation from boot camp.  I often reflect on those days, those experiences, those friends (shipmates).  I recall the challenges that strengthened me physically and mentally; trials that built character within me.  I cherish the rewards of achievement and success that came from every push-up, inspection and exam.  Although there were those times where it didn’t seem possible to finish, everything somehow came together.  Somehow our recruit company came together.  And, on August 22, 1986, we assembled to celebrate our collective accomplishments in our pass-in-review ceremony at graduation.

In those short eight weeks, some of the most valuable traits and qualities were instilled in me.  Honor, courage, and commitment, the core values of the United States Navy, were the bedrock principles of my training.

The Core Values of the United States Navy

Honor: When we say “bear true faith and allegiance,” we are promising to:

  • Conduct ourselves in the highest ethical manner in all relationships
  • Deal honestly and truthfully with others
  • Make honest recommendations and accept those junior to us
  • Encourage new ideas and deliver the bad news, even when it is unpopular
  • Abide by an uncompromising code of integrity, taking responsibility for our actions and keeping our word
  • Fulfill or exceed our legal and ethical responsibilities in our public and personal lives 24 hours a day
  • Be mindful of the privilege to serve our fellow Americans

Courage: When we say “support and defend,” we are promising to:

  • Meet the demands of our profession and the mission when it is hazardous, demanding or otherwise difficult
  • Make decisions in the best interest of the Navy and the nation, without regard to personal consequences
  • Meet all challenges while adhering to a higher standard of personal conduct and decency
  • Be loyal to our nation, ensuring the resources entrusted to us are used in an honest, careful and efficient way
  • Have the moral and mental strength to do what is right, even in the face of personal or professional adversity

Commitment: When we say “obey the orders,” we are promising to:

  • Demand respect up and down the chain of command
  • Care for the safety, professional, personal, and spiritual well-being of the people entrusted to us
  • Show respect toward all people without regard to race, religion or gender
  • Treat each individual with human dignity
  • Be committed to positive change and constant improvement
  • Exhibit the highest degree of moral character, technical excellence, quality, and competence in what we have been trained to do
  • Work together as a team to improve the quality of our work, our people, andourselves[iii]

The Navy’s core values became the ingredients that transformed me into a sailor, and ultimately the cornerstones of my life and career.  My boot camp and Navy experience culminated in my having the following three valuable attributes:

  1. Highly motivated to overcome all challenges; having the self-discipline to achieve all tasks completely and successfully.
  2. Attention to detail, and being detail-oriented.  Following direction and learning to listen, while having situational awareness at all times.
  3. Pride and professionalism.  To always showcase respect for people and resources.  To carry myself with honor, and to have integrity in all that I do.  And, to always be committed to the team, organization and community I belong.

August 22 is a very important date in my life.  Similar to my birthday, it signifies the day that officially began my Navy career.  It is a day that I am extremely proud of, and I wanted to share it with you.

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[i]  Webb, Brandon; David Mann, John (2012). The Red Circle. Macmillan. p. 81. ISBN 978-1-250-01840-3. “… Naval Station Great Lakes (or unofficially, Great Mistakes)”

[ii]  “Recruit Training Command – Mission.” Recruit Training Command – Mission. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Aug. 2016. http://www.bootcamp.navy.mil/mission.html

[iii]  “Navy Boot Camp Timeline At a Glance.” Military.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Aug. 2016. http://www.military.com/join-armed-forces/navy-boot-camp-schedule.html

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Top Gun – Still Flying High after 30 Years

Posted in Current Affairs, Leadership, Naval Leadership with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 12, 2016 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

 

I was 17-years-old and a junior in high school in the first half of 1986. The United States was at the height of the Cold War.  President Ronald Reagan’s strategic plan to improve the capabilities of naval forces, known as the 600-ship Navy, was gaining momentum.  And, the nation came together to mourn the loss of Space Shuttle Challenger, mission STS-51-L, as its crew of 7 astronauts perished, including schoolteacher Christa McAuliffe.  Being proud to be an American in the strongest, most spirited nation in the world was common back then.

During that same time, while most of my classmates were taking SAT’s and planning their future, I was taking the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); the test used to determine qualification for enlistment in the United States Armed Forces.  Influenced by my uncle, Thomas Aulenbach, a 1963 graduate of the United States Naval Academy, my ambition was to join the United States Navy.

It was a deep sense of pride, and a desire to be part of something greater than myself, that drove me to make the best and most important decision of my life; to join the world’s greatest navy, and to reach out to live my dreams.  I entered into a Naval Reserve program known as The Naval Reserve Sea Air Mariner Program (SAM).  This program allowed me to be one of very few to ever join the Navy in my junior year of high school, go to basic training in the summer after my junior year, then drill one weekend a month at a local Naval Reserve center during my senior year of high school.

There were a few other things that further stoked my pride and ambitions to join the Navy back in those days.  I remember sitting in my recruiter’s office hearing Lee Greenwood’s ‘God Bless the USA,’ which was rapidly becoming the country’s unofficial national anthem.  It seemed like it was playing on repeat, ringing in my ears over and over again.  Or, maybe it was just a clever recruiting tactic; one that was working.  I still get an overwhelming emotional feeling each time I hear it; no different from hearing any other patriotic tune.  To this day, that song remains near the top of my list of all-time favorites.

One month before I left for boot camp, on May 16, 1986, the iconic movie, Top Gun, opened in theaters.  Starring Tom Cruise, playing the role of Lieutenant Pete ‘Maverick’ Mitchell, Top Gun would become one of the most endearing military movies of all time.  From its opening scene (may I opine: The best opening scene to a movie ever!), to it victorious ending, this movie is jam-packed with great action and music.

Top Gun is about the former United States Navy Fighter Weapons School, at what was then called Naval Air Station Miramar, located north of San Diego, California; Fightertown U.S.A.  The film glamorizes the life of naval aviators by portraying them as cocky, highly competitive hotshots driven to be the best of the best among all Navy fighter pilots.

* Naval Air Station (NAS) Miramar is now known as Marine Corps Air Station Miramar (MCAS Miramar). The United States Navy Fighter Weapons School (Top Gun) was merged into the Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center at NAS Fallon, Nevada, and is now known as the United States Navy Strike Fighter Tactics Instructor Program (SFTI program). The program is intended to teach fighter and strike tactics and techniques to selected Naval Aviators and Naval Flight Officers who return to their operating units as surrogate instructors.

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Related Content:  Top Gun 30 Years Ago via The Sextant (U.S. Navy History)

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Have Some Fun:

Which ‘Top Gun’ Character Are You?

Quiz #1          Quiz #2          Quiz #3          Quiz #4

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Call Sign Generator

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Top Gun puts viewers into the cockpit of an F-14 Tomcat for the thrill and adrenaline rush of flying one of the Navy’s most maneuverable fighter jets.  The film has had a cult following in its 30 years since it’s release, and continues to motivate anyone who has been in or around the Navy, particularly those who aspire to become fighter pilots.  Last year, it was added to the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry, joining only 675 other films for that designation.

The movie’s music, with songs on the original soundtrack like Danger Zone (Kenny Loggins), Take My Breath Away (Berlin), Mighty Wings (Cheap Trick), and other songs featured in famous scenes, such as Great Balls of Fire and You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin, remain as timeless as the movie itself.  When they’re played on the radio, there’s no question that they came from Top Gun.

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Related Content:  Top Gun at 30: A Retrospective from Two Naval Aviators via War on the Rocks

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The Pentagon Goes Hollywood

It was the Navy’s cooperation that put the planes in the picture. The producers paid the military $1.8 million for the use of Miramar Naval Air Station, as well as four aircraft carriers, about two dozen F-14 Tomcats, and a few F-5 Tigers and A-4 Skyhawks; some flown by real-life top-gun pilots.  The dogfight scenes were carefully choreographed by experienced military pilots, and a some of the movies most memorable scenes were meticulously researched for their realism and authenticity.  The movie’s Navy and Hollywood connection made real history.

Then, there are those scenes that would just never happen.  For example, Maverick’s tower fly-by (aka buzzing the tower).  This became the symbolic statement by Maverick of his commitment to being a, well, maverick.  But, doing this is not recommended.  You’ll lose your wings, get a boot permanently stuck up your posterior, and you’ll certainly find yourself flying a desk until your court-martial.  So, the answer will ALWAYS be, “negative ghost rider, the pattern is full.”

Soon after the movie came out, there was a boost in Navy recruitment.  Although Pentagon regulations prohibited the Navy from promoting the movie in its recruitment efforts, Navy recruiters could be found setting up recruiting tables in many of the theaters where the movie was being shown.  In 1987, the Navy cleverly released a Top Gun-themed recruitment commercial with “Danger Zone”-sounding music to continue the successful recruiting trend.

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In addition to its excellent music and its action-packed scenes, the movie’s dialogue is immortal.  Comical, hard-hitting and full of power and meaning, Top Gun is full of unforgettable lines, like these:

Son, your ego is writing checks your body can’t cash.” ~ Captain Tom “Stinger” Jordan

“Top Gun rules of engagement are written for your safety and for that of your team.  They are not flexible, nor am I” ~ CDR Mike “Viper” Metcalf (Commander, U.S. Navy Fighter Weapons School – Top Gun)

“A good pilot is compelled to evaluate what’s happened, so he can apply what he’s learned” ~ Viper

These, and many other lines, certainly capture the strict discipline and protocol that you would expect from the military.  And, then there are lines that you might use at work just to annoy your co-workers, such as the infamous, “I feel the need … the need for speed.”  Or, there are lines like the ones listed below that are suited for everyday use and have particular meaning (click on image to be taken to larger image via its web link ):

img_1847

*Courtesy: The Further Adventures of Doctrine Man (Facebook), aka Doctrine Man (Twitter)*

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Out of the movie also comes leadership wisdom.  Top Gun is referenced often when discussing leadership and team dynamics; a sort of leadership ethos.  This was extensively explored by Bob Jennings and J. Israel Thompson in a series of posts that were written as fictional “interviews” with key characters from the movie.  Links to each of those posts are listed below:

Often in the movie, however, there are those times when a butt-chewing was necessaryThe fine art of delivering corrective action is sometimes garnished with some colorful language.  As the movie evolves, you notice Viper’s style becomes the textbook example of how to deliver negative feedback.  There is, obviously, a right way and a wrong way.

‘Top Gun’ still soars at 30, while shooting for that sequel, which will again star Tom Cruise.  And, although the F-14 Tomcat is no longer part of the Navy’s arsenal, and pilots are becoming more like gamers sitting in sophisticated theater-like consoles flying drones (unmanned aerial vehicles), no one has lost that loving feeling for Top Gun.  It’s popularity continues to fly high after 30 years.  For some of us, it will never get old.  In fact, Top Gun Day is celebrated every year on May 13th.  Why do they celebrate it on that day, when the movie was released on May 16?  Good question.  Here is your answer.

If you haven’t had the opportunity to see the movie, I highly recommend it.  If you have, I would be surprised if you don’t feel the same way I do every time it comes on television, or when Kenny Loggins comes on the radio with “Danger Zone.”  It’s a movie where the pilots and the viewer are both on the edge of their seat experiencing the exhilaration of life as a naval aviator.  One thing is certain, the movie puts into perspective our need to call the ball; to know, and be absolutely certain, that we are on the correct approach path to catching the wire in life, career, business, etc.  If we are gliding off the path, we need to know how to correct our approach.  This is the lesson … the moral of the story … that Top Gun provides.

 

 

To All Veterans on This Veterans Day…

Posted in Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 11, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

veterans-day-images-free

THANK YOU!!!

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Freedom isn’t free.  Men and women throughout our history have paid the price, sometimes the ultimate price of their lives, to ensure your life of freedom is preserved for you now and long into the future.  On this Veterans Day, we honor…we thank…we celebrate their courage, commitment and sacrifice for us; your fellow Americans.

Thank a Veteran today! Thank them for paving the road to continued freedom and fighting to ensure that our Country’s ideals are secured.  We owe them more than a dedicated day on the calendar.

Freedom Isn’t Free

And, this is why they fight and why we honor:

For freedom, they stand and fight:

The Navy Hymn: “Eternal Father, Strong to Save”

Posted in Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 14, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

On this Sunday following yesterday’s celebration of the 237th birthday of the United States Navy, I thought it appropriate to share with you the story of The Navy Hymn; Eternal Father, Strong to Save.”

Click HERE to listen to the hymn

Eternal Father, strong to save,
Whose arm hath bound the restless wave,
Who bidd’st the mighty ocean deep
Its own appointed limits keep;
Oh, hear us when we cry to Thee,
For those in peril on the sea!

O Christ! Whose voice the waters heard
And hushed their raging at Thy word,
Who walked’st on the foaming deep,
And calm amidst its rage didst sleep;
Oh, hear us when we cry to Thee,
For those in peril on the sea!

Most Holy Spirit! Who didst brood
Upon the chaos dark and rude,
And bid its angry tumult cease,
And give, for wild confusion, peace;
Oh, hear us when we cry to Thee,
For those in peril on the sea!

O Trinity of love and power!
Our brethren shield in danger’s hour;
From rock and tempest, fire and foe,
Protect them wheresoe’er they go;
Thus evermore shall rise to Thee
Glad hymns of praise from land and sea.

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The Rev. William Whiting, a schoolmaster and clergyman of the Church of England, who lived from 1825 to 1878, wrote the original words as a hymn in 1860.  In the following year, the words were adapted to music by another English clergyman, the Rev. John B. Dykes, who lived from 1823 to 1876.

In the United States, the late Rear Adm. Charles Jackson Train, an 1865 graduate of the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, was a lieutenant commander stationed at the Academy in charge of the Midshipman Choir.  In 1879, Lt. Cdr. Train inaugurated the present practice of concluding Sunday’s Divine Services at the Academy with the singing of the first verse of this hymn.  Today, this song can be found in most church hymnals.

This hymn is often used at funerals for personnel who served in, or were associated with, the Navy. For example, Eternal Father was the favorite hymn of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and was sung at his funeral at Hyde Park, New York in April 1945.  Roosevelt had served as Secretary of the Navy.  This hymn was also played as President John F. Kennedy’s body was carried up the steps of the capitol to lie in state.

The song, known to United States Navy men and women as the “Navy Hymn,” is a musical benediction.  It is a prayer for safety on the high seas. And, nobody senses the need of God more than those in peril; those in peril on the sea, on the land and in the air.  Those in the United States Navy need God’s strong arm, guarding hand and watchful care.

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File:USNavyChurchPennant.svg

Img5.jpgO Eternal Father, strong to save, we pause to remember the founding of the Navy.  We remember all who have served in the air, on land, on sea and under the sea.

Those whose lives were given in dark jungles, ocean depths, desert sands or on far distant bases and beaches.  May we recognize their contributions to the security of our nation.

Grant, O God, your blessing and protection on all men and women who now serve in our Navy, on watch and on station around the world, from the Caribbean to the Mediterranean, from the Western Pacific to the Middle East, especially those defending freedom in the Persian Gulf and Afghanistan.  O Lord, may our soldiers and sailors be a safeguard unto the United States of America.

Put new meaning in our national commitment of “Peace through Strength,” that we may truly strive to be instruments of peace in a distrustful world.

Almighty God, we commend to your gracious care and keeping all the men and women of our country’s Navy ashore and afloat, and all who serve in our Armed Forces.  Defend them day by day with your heavenly grace; strengthen them; keep them safe from evil; give them courage to face the perils which beset them and grant them a sense of your abiding presence wherever they may be.

God, who founded the seas and equipped them with the very resources that sustain life on this planet, we seek your will for our nation in meeting its obligations to maintain the freedom of the seas.  We ask your blessings on the ships and their crews of the United States Naval forces in meeting their commitments.  Preserve them from the dangers of sea, air & land and bring them safely to port.

On this occasion of the birth of the United States Navy, save, sanctify and bless those in the Navy with favoring winds over the sea and into harbor.  According to your good will, and as their divine and heavenly pilot, bring them at last to the haven of peace.

Related Article –

The 237th Birthday of the United States Navy (commandperformanceleadership.wordpress.com)

The Birthday of the United States Navy ~ October 13, 1775

Posted in Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , , on October 13, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

3x5 United States Navy Flag USA US Naval Military Flags

Listen to THIS while reading this post!!! (link will open in new window to allow you to read the post while listening to “Anchors Aweigh.”)

“Without a decisive Naval force we can
do nothing definitive – and with it,
everything honorable and glorious.”

George Washington to Marquis de Lafayette, November 15, 1781

Today, October 13th, we celebrate a birthday.  We pause to celebrate the great heritage and birthday of the United States Navy; a formidable force in war, a potent power in peace, a respected adversary in conflict, an effective deterrent to war, and a welcomed means of compassionate assistance to those whose misfortunes make the Navy the means of their survival and hope.

On October 13th, 1775, the Continental Congress passed a resolution creating the Continental Navy.  For 242 years, men and women have accepted the rigors of our nation’s naval service.  For as long as our men and women have gone to sea in ships, they have felt the awesome urging and mystery which takes them from those they love, and to whom they long to return.  They have known that life lived only for one’s self is too constrictive, they have taken up arms for lives more precious than their own.  The sailor’s dedication to successfully sail the unobstructed seas is celebrated today on the birthday of the United States Navy.

Today, we celebrate the maturation of thousands of young Americans who, because of their service in the U.S. Navy, have sharpened their understanding of responsibility and honor.  We celebrate the countless hours of selfless sacrifice and devoted service evidenced by those of our Navy.  We celebrate the patience of those who accept without protest the hardships of shipboard life: living with seasickness, undergoing lengthy separations and enduring cramped living environments.

Sailors at sea America’s fighting men and women of the United States Navy, standing on guard over the free world, are held together by a common bond; their love of life and liberty for ourselves and for our loved ones.  When hostility and conflict threaten the stability of peace, when turmoil and chaos erupt around the world, the Navy is forward deployed and positioned as a floating fortress of men and machines blanketing the globe, striving to make the world a better place.

Today, their valor is commemorated and we properly honor their outstanding service.  The men and women of the United States Navy devote themselves to the fullest accomplishment of their every responsibility.  Their nation looks to them with pride and as a model of excellence in execution of every task.  We celebrate this glorious day with deep gratitude.

Today, we share the mystical experience of the sea so hard to describe to someone who has never known it.  We share the disciplined training in preparing for events we hope will never happen.  We share their sadness at leaving those they love and their joy in returning to them again.  We share their conviction that no other job would be quite so satisfying as serving at sea with men and women we respect and admire.  We share their sense of adventure in looking forward to new ports and, as yet, unsailed seas.

Throughout history, the seafaring men and women of the U.S. Navy, heroes one and all, have always stood at the ready.  By sea and by air, the U.S. Navy has always answered duty’s call.  From the sailors on deck to the skilled pilots of fighter jets, the men and women of our Navy work with one goal in mind: to defend freedom wherever it may be challenged.

They’re out to sea for sometimes six, or even nine months. or more leaving behind friends, loved ones and the comfort of home.  They brave the mighty oceans around the far-flung corners of the globe never knowing where duty may call; the duty to protect America’s liberty.  They courageously do what every sailor in the United States Navy has done before; at the ready for duty, ever vigilant, and prepared to defend America.

As Americans, knowing that these valiant heroes are protecting us with unyielding courage and honor, should give us great comfort.  The Department of the Navy, as a portrait of honor and service, speaks to the patriot in us all.

File:United States Navy Ethos 2008.pdf

File:United States Navy Ethos 2008.pdf

The Sailor's Creed

I am a United States Sailor.
I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States of America and I will obey the orders of those appointed over me.
I represent the fighting spirit of the Navy and those who have gone before me to defend freedom and democracy around the world.
I proudly serve my country’s Navy combat team with Honor, Courage and Commitment.
I am committed to excellence and the fair treatment of all.

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A Global Force for Good (nebraskaenergyobserver.wordpress.com)

Navy Birthday Information – 13 October 1775 (history.navy.mil)

Navy Birthday – 13 October 1775 (history.navy.mil)

Celebrating 242 Years on October 13! (navy.mil)

The Navy Turns 242 (military.com)

Articles and Links from Original Posting on 10/13/2012 =

237 Years of Putting Warfighting First (navy.mil)

SecNav Highlights Heritage and Warfighting in Birthday Message to the Fleet (navy.mil)

SECNAV Navy Birthday Message (navy.mil)

CNO Navy Birthday Message (navy.mil)

MCPON’s Navy Birthday Message (navy.mil)

Naval Station Norfolk Holds Birthday Celebration (navy.mil)

Six Key Words for CNO Birthday Message: Warfighting First, Operate Forward, and Be Ready (navy.mil)

What is a Teammate?

Posted in Leadership, Video of the Week with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 11, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

File:USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112) photo illustration.jpgThis past Saturday, October 6, the United States Navy commissioned its newest guided-missile destroyer, the USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112), at pier 88 in Manhattan, New York City.  This ship honors Lt. (SEAL) Michael P. Murphy, a New York native who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions during Operation Red Wings in Afghanistan, June 28, 2005.

Among other distinguished guests, in attendance for the commissioning ceremony were the Mayor of New York City, the Honorable Michael Bloomberg, the Secretary of the Navy, the Honorable Ray Mabus, and Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), Adm. Jonathan Greenert.  Also present was Adm. William McRaven, Commander, U.S. Special Operations Command.  It was Adm. McRaven’s four-minute remarks during the ceremony that stood out to me, and is the subject of this post.

“Michael Murphy represents all that is good about our special operations warrior.  And, to have a fine fighting ship named after him is the highest compliment one could’ve paid to Murph, and all the SOF soldiers and SEALs who perished that fateful day,” Adm. McRaven said.  “In the SEAL teams, the greatest compliment one SEAL can bestow upon another is to call him a teammate.  It’s a simple term, but it conveys everything about how we live, how we fight, and sometimes how we die,” Adm. McRaven said.

What is a teammate?  Watch the video below, and let Admiral William McRaven define it for you.

The following video is a combination tribute to Lt. (SEAL) Michael Murphy and remarks by Adm. McRaven from the ship’s commissioning. Unfortunately, I was unable to embed the raw video from his speech. But, you can find the original video HERE. But, the video I am presenting here is quite touching. Adm. McRaven’s remarks, along with the music and images in the video, make it perfect for this post.

Lt. (SEAL) Michael P. Murphy lived, fought and died a teammate to his shipmates; a teammate to the end.

To the crew of the Michael Murphy, you have a legacy to uphold.  Murph would expect anything bearing his name to be battle-ready at all times; to go in harm’s way when the Nation calls, and to bond together as teammates, knowing that it’s not the metal in the ship that makes you strong, it’s the hearts and souls of her crew that make her invincible.  To the officers and crew of the USS Michael Murphy, may Michael’s spirit steady your resolve and guide your every deed.

Admiral William McRaven

Saturday, October 6, 2012

Commissioning Ceremony

USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112)

 

Related Articles –

USS Michael Murphy Commissioning – full live webcast (youtube.com)

SEAL of Honor (sealofhonor.com)

USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112) on Facebook (facebook.com)

#Warfighter: USS Michael Murphy Crew Honors Namesake (navy.mil)

A New Method of Resupplying ~ Putting “I intend to…” into Action

Posted in Leadership, Naval Leadership, Reading Room with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 1, 2012 by Dale Wilson - Author of Command Performance

Another excerpt fromTurn The Ship Around! How to Create Leadership at Every Level, By L. David Marquet, Captain, U.S. Navy (retired), published by Greenleaf Book Group LLC, released today, August 1, 2012:

For context, read the post, “I intend to…,” before reading this excerpt.

Chapter 28

“A New Method of Resupplying”

A submarine at dawnSanta Fe was operating in the Strait of Hormuz and we were running low on oil.  I was “thinking out loud” (one of our mechanisms) with the Engineer in the control room when a solution came from an unexpected place: the newest officer on board.  After listening to a discussion about our need for more oil, Ensign Aviles chimed in. He was manning the periscope and was looking at the contacts around us.  “Hey, that’s a fast-resupply ship. Why don’t we just ask them for some oil?”  I looked at the periscope display and, sure enough, the USS Rainier is transiting through the Strait of Hormuz several miles away.  The Rainier was a supply ship designed to support a carrier battle group.  She carried 2 million gallons of diesel fuel, 2 million gallons of jet fuel, and tons of ammunition and supplies.  All we needed was a few cans of oil. Surely Rainier would have that.

There was a problem.  All ship movements in the carrier battle group were pre-directed 36 hours in advance.  One just didn’t “call up” and get supplied.  But I was curious.  I waved the flashlight around.  “Go ahead, guys, see if you can set it up.”

“I intend to break radio silence to coordinate a resupply from Rainier,” said the Officer on Deck (OOD).

“Very well.”

USS RAINIER (AOE-7).jpgThe OOD called Rainier on the radio, identified who we were, and what we needed.  Sure enough, they would supply us!  Fortunately, Captain Kendall Card, commander of the Rainier, had reinforced with his crew that they were there to support the ships of the U.S. Navy, and that trumped bureaucracy.  I’d never heard of such a thing.  Not only that but the CO invited us to send over any crew members who needed medical or dental checkups beyond what Santa Fe’s Doc Hill could provide.

Rainier had a schedule to maintain; we couldn’t delay long.  If we didn’t get surfaced in a few minutes, it wouldn’t be able to stay around to help us.

The crew sprung to action, to which I gave my immediate assent.

From the Officer of the Deck: “Captain, I intend to prepare to surface.”

Very well.

From the Chief of the Boat (COB): “I intend to muster the small boat handling party in the crew’s mess.  I intend to open the forward escape trunk lower hatch.  COB is Chief in Charge.”

Very well.

From Doc Hill: “I intend to muster selected personnel for dental checkups in the crew’s mess, conducting watch reliefs as necessary.”

Very well.

From the admin officer, Petty Officer Scott Dillon: “Captain, I intend to canvass the crew for outgoing mail and transfer it to Rainier.”

Very well.

From the supply officer: “Captain, I intend to transfer the hydraulic oil from Rainier.”

Very well.

Myriad various activities happened quickly and in a synchronized manner.  Here’s where the training paid off.  There’s no way I would have been able to pull off a plan for conducting this kind of operation and direct it piece by piece.  You could call it speed of response, or reducing the sense-act delay inherent in organizations, or adaptability to change.  Whatever you call it, the crew’s performance allowed us to resupply at sea and continue being a submarine in defense of the country rather than limping into port for a fill up.

*Reprinted with permission from “Turn The Ship Around!: How to Create Leadership at Every Level”, by L. David Marquet, 2012, Greenleaf Book Group Press, Austin, Texas. Copyright © 2012 by Louis David Marquet.

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If you would like to order the book “Turn The Ship Around!: How to Create Leadership at Every Level”, please visit:

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Turn The Ship Around! A Captain’s Guide to Creating Leadership at Every Level

Up Scope!

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In Memory of Dr. Stephen R. Covey (1932 – 2012)

“I intend to . . .”

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